Caer


  1. Caer Brythwch

    An ancient name for Scotland.

    A city, probably in Wales, but lost to modern geographers. The only Arthurian association with the city comes in Culhwch and Olwen, where Arthurís chief gatekeeper, Glewlwyd, says that he was in Caer Brythwch, and possibly implies some Arthurian involvement. The larger legend to which this remark likely refers is lost to history.


  2. Caer Calemion

    Nennius mentioned this name and Barber and Pykitt wants to link it with Camelot.


    See also
    Llanmelin | The Legend of King Arthur



  3. Caer Dathal-Math

    A stronghold and home of Arthurís warriors Teregud, Caradawg, Sulyen, Bradwen, Moren, and Siawn - all sons of Iaen.


  4. Caer Fanddwy

    An alternate name for Annwn, the Celtic Otherworld. The meaning of fanddwy is unknown.


  5. Caer Feddwid
    'Fortress of Carousal' | Caer Feddwidd, Caer Rigor, Caer Siddi

    The Fort of Carousal, which is located in the Welsh Otherworld realm of Annwfn. Caer Feddwidd is a paradisiacal realm in which a fountain runs with wine and no one ever knowns illness or old age. Later tradition says it was visited by King Arthur and his retinue..


  6. Caer Gai
    Caergai

    A location on the river Dee in Merioneth, Wales, where, according to bardic tradition, Arthur and Kay was raised.


  7. Caer Goludd

    An alternate name for Annwn, the Welsh otherworld. K. Jackson (Loomis, Romance, 16) suggests "Inward City" as a translation.


  8. Caer Greu

    In Welsh oral tradition, Peredur and Gwrgi were killed fighting Eda Great-Knee at Caer Greu, after their warriors abandoned them. The name may be a variation of Caer Creu, meaning "city of blood".


  9. Caer Llundein
    Caer Llud

    An ancient name of London.


    See also
    Lundein | The Legend of King Arthur
    Lwndrys | The Legend of King Arthur



  10. Caer Nefenhyr Nine-Teeth

    A city, probably in Wales, but lost to modern geographers. The only Arthurian association with the city comes in Culhwch and Olwen, where Arthurís chief gatekeeper, Glewlwyd, says that he was in Caer Nefenhyr, and possibly implies some Arthurian involvement. The larger legend to which this remark likely refers is lost to history.


  11. Caer Ochren

    An alternate name for Annwn, the Celtic otherworld.


  12. Caer Oeth

    A city probably in Wales. Welsh oral tradition had it that Arthur was imprisoned in Caer Oeth for three days by Gwen Pendragon before he was transferred to another prison.


  13. Caer Pedryfran

    A nickname for Annwn, the Celtic otherworld. It may signify a four-cornered fortress.


  14. Caer Rigor
    Caer Feddwid, Caer Feddwidd, Caer Siddi

    An alternative name for Caer Feddwidd, which is also known as Caer Siddi, or the Fort of Carousal. Though Welsh tradition states that Caer Feddwidd contains a fountain that runs with wine, and no one there knows old age, this variant would seem to suggest a realm of the dead from which there is no return.


  15. Caer Se

    A British city, once inhabited or visited by Arthurís chief gatekeeper Glewlwyd.


  16. Caer Seint

    The Welsh name for the Roman fort of Segontium.


  17. Caer Siddi
    'Fairy Fortress' | Caer Feddwid, Caer Feddwidd, Caer Rigor

    In the Welsh poem The Spoils of Annwn and a non-Arthurian poem in the Book of Taliesin - an alternative name for Caer Feddwidd, the Otherworld Fort of Carousal, which shares the same attribute of having a fountain that runs with wine. Welsh tradition makes Arianrhod the ruler of Caer Siddi, though Arthurian legend does not seem to mention the name of the ruler on the occasion when Arthur and his men visited the mysterious fort.


  18. Caer Vandwy

    An otherwordly castle, belonging to Gwyn ap Nudd, in Annwfn. According to Preiddeu Annwn Arthur and his men plundered it.


  19. Caer Wydyr
    'Fortress of Glass' | Caer Wydr

    A glass fort that is located in Annwfn, the Welsh Otherworld. Later tradition says that, like Caer Feddwidd, this fort was visited by King Arthur and his company, but they were unable to make its watchman talk to them.


    See also
    Fort of Glass | The Legend of King Arthur

Notes
Caer is a Welsh name for a wall or mound for defence - a city or castle wall, a fortress.

The root to this word might be cau, to shut up, to close, to fence, to enclose with a hedge. Cue means a field enclosed with hedges. When the Britons began to build cities they built a fortified wall to surround them, which were called caer.

The name Chester is a Saxonized form of the Latin castruni, a fort (and one of the few words recognised as directly inherited from the Roman invaders), is a common prefix and suffix in English place-names, such as: Colchester, Manchester, Chesterford, Chesterton. In the Danish and Anglian districts "Chester" is replaced with "caster", such as: Doncaster and Lancaster, but both forms are allied to casirum, a Latinization of the Celtic caer.