Auvergne

Overgne

Auvergne is a historical region in central France. It is situated in a mountainous region, characterized by volcanic landscapes, including extinct volcanoes known as puys.

Auvergne was conquered in Layamon’s Brut by Hoel of Brittany for Arthur. The Prose Lancelot gives King Aramont of Brittany as its overlord. He became Uther Pendragon’s vassal in order to brave Claudas.

According to Malory, it was one of Lancelot’s lands. Lancelot made Sir Gahalantyne the duke of Auvergne in return for Gahalantyne’s support in the war against Arthur.


Auvernge | 1st century BC – 9th century AD

Roman Period | 1st century BC – 5th century AD
The Auvergne region was part of Roman Gaul, and it experienced Roman influence and cultural integration. Roman roads, such as the Via Agrippa, connected different parts of the region and facilitated trade and communication. The Roman presence is reflected in archaeological remains, including Roman villas and infrastructure.

Migration Period | 4th – 6th centuries
The decline of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century marked the beginning of the Migration Period. Various Germanic tribes, including the Visigoths and Burgundians, passed through or settled in the region during this period.

Frankish Rule | 6th – 9th centuries
The Frankish king Clovis I, who united much of Gaul under Frankish rule, played a significant role in the region’s history. The Merovingian and Carolingian dynasties saw the integration of the Auvergne into the Frankish realm. The region became part of the Carolingian Empire under Charlemagne in the eighth century.

Christianization | Late Antiquity – 8th century
Christianity spread in the region during late antiquity, and several Christian communities were established. The influence of the Church increased, and monastic foundations played a role in the region’s religious and cultural development.

Viking Raids | 8th – 9th centuries
The Viking raids, which affected various parts of Western Europe, also reached the Auvergne region in the late eighth and early ninth centuries. The raids led to the fortification of some settlements as defense against Viking incursions.


Sources
Brut | Layamon, late 12th century to mid-13th century
Lancelot do Lac | 1215-1220
Le Morte Darthur | Sir Thomas Malory, 1469-1470