Nottingham

Nortigean, Notigehan

Nottingham is a city in the county of Nottinghamshire in the East Midlands of England. The River Trent flows through the city.

In the First Continuation of Chrétien’s PercevalArthur presents Nottingham to Lord Guiromelant when he marries ClarissantGawain’s sister.

According to the fourteenth-century Short Metrical ChronicleLancelot built Nottingham to house Queen Guinevere during his civil war with Arthur.


Nottingham | 0 to 800 AD

In the centuries immediately following the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the early fifth century, the region that would become Nottingham was likely inhabited by various Celtic and Romano-British communities.

Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Mercia | 5th – 8th centuries AD
The Anglo-Saxon migration and settlement in Britain began in the fifth century. Mercia was one of the major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms that emerged in central England during the sixth and seventh centuries. Nottingham would have been part of Mercia’s territory. The region experienced the influence of early Anglo-Saxon rulers and the establishment of local governance structures, possibly centered around fortified settlements.

Viking Raids and Settlements
Towards the end of the eighth century, Viking raids on England began. The Norse Vikings, seafaring warriors from Scandinavia, targeted coastal and inland areas. Nottingham, situated on the River Trent, may have been exposed to Viking raids during this period.

The Viking influence increased in the ninth century, leading to the establishment of the Danelaw, a region in which Norse law and customs held sway. Nottingham, being strategically located, could have witnessed Viking settlement or influence during this time.

The need for defense against Viking raids may have led to the creation or enhancement of defensive structures in and around Nottingham. The construction of fortified sites would have been crucial during this turbulent period.

Early Christianization
The process of Christianization also occured during this period. Missionaries, including those sent by the Roman Catholic Church, worked to convert Anglo-Saxon and Viking communities. The establishment of early churches or religious sites might have begun in Nottingham during this time.


Sources
First Continuation of Chrétien’s Perceval | Attributed to Wauchier of Denain, c. 1200
Short Metrical Chronicle | 1307